Paradise Valley Outing

Report by Lesley Frescura

Wednesday 18 October

The morning dawned with the promise of a beautiful day, and at 07.30 five intrepid birders – John, Sandi, Rani, Ros and Lesley met in the car park and made their way into the NR and over the bridge.

The bridge is in dire need of repair with side pieces missing.

We then proceeded along the path by the river which was running strongly after the recent rains. The strelitzia nicotiana is in bloom, and there were many birds along the way enjoying the nectar.

We spotted 2 White-eared Barbet babies recently out of the nest, and staying close to the tree which provided excellent hiding places.

There was evidence of some washaways on the river bank, and quite a few fallen logs and tree branches. As we made our way further down the path, we noted the alien invasive vegetation including balloon vine, triffids and lantana.

The birds flitted amongst the trees full of song and searching for food – be it bugs under the bark, insects in flight or fruit ripening on the trees.

We made our way to the wooden bridge over the river and once again remarked on the broken sides, which may or may not have been caused by the storm of the week before. However we felt that signs should be put up warning parents that children should not be on the bridges unaccompanied.

We then made our way to the furthest spot on the river and John spotted an Eagle flying over a nest. We took the upper path on our return and ended the morning enjoying our tea at the riverside where there are again many birds to watch, ID and enjoy. The Mountain Wagtails were there to show Rani.

Thanks to Sandi for the bird list. Click here to see the list.

Best regards

Lesley Frescura

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week. You will notice that we have a new Cape Vulture on the map- N207- a sub-adult bird that was rehabilitated by Ben Hoffman (Raptor Rescue) and released in the southern Drakensberg by Ben and Chris Kelly (Wildlife Act). This bird was fitted with the transmitter that was recovered from Kloutjie.

The necropsy report revealed that Kloutjie died of trauma – the type that would be expected from being shot at. X-Rays revealed a cracked skull and broken humerus. He was not poisoned and lead levels in the bone were low. We will need to schedule some awareness activities within the region to address human persecution.

You may also notice that I have updated the birds’ ages. All our Bearded Vultures are now adults, with the youngest being those caught as one year old birds in 2012.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Alverstone Outing

Saturday 7 October 2017

Report by Elena Russell

It was an amazing morning. The mist did not lift till nearly 8 o’clock so the birding was spasmodic.

Misty Morning – Decklan Jordaan

We would hear a Dark-capped Bulbul and then a dark shape would fly past!! Dave Rimmer came up with “misty moisty morning when cloudy was the weather” (Steeleye Span).

Maybe not the best alliteration but then nobody came up with anything better. It kept us amused whilst we did a head-count, just in case we lost someone in the thick mist. Twenty one birders braved the weather and our bird count was 78.  We also raised R420 for the Alverstone conservancy.

Once the mist started to lift the birding improved tremendously and in fact the sun came out and it was a great morning.

We walked the grassland path down to the bottom dam where the Holb’s Golden Weavers are in residence. Knysna (heard) and Purple Crested Turacos seen, masses of Cape Robin-Chats, Cape Canary and lots more – thanks to Sandi who did the bird list which is attached. Click here to see the list.

Dave Rimmer who keeps the so called “official reserve list” added a further 9 species to the list which now stands at 118 for the reserve  (Click here to see their list). The following were added to the reserve list: –

Cape Canary

African Pygmy Kingfisher

Brown-backed Honeybird

African Goshawk

Natal Spurfowl

African Pipit

House Sparrow

Red-throated Wryneck

Green Wood-hoopoe

Our bird of the morning was the Olive Bushshrike, some really great views and of course we had to have an orchid – Disa Woodii.

Crinum were flowering on the hillside and spiders on webs in the misty moist wet grass – the Saturday Chat Show does tend to look at everything.

Spider in the dew -Decklan Jordaan

We found a reed frog (presume it is a reed frog as it was on a reed).

We made our way back up the forest path and once on the top walking back to the picnic site we picked up African and Plain-backed Pipit.

Thanks to the photographers, Dave, Hennie, Decklan and Tony for the great photos.

Elena Russell

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BirdLife Trogons Newsletter

Click here to read the latest BirdLife Trogons Newsletter.

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture Tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

I am still awaiting the autopsy report from Kloutjie and will share the cause of his death as soon as I have it. Although it looked like poison was cause of death, he had no food in his crop/stomach and tested negative for poison.

The Rhino Peak Challenge was a successful event on the 22 September 2017 with over R300 000 raised for Rhino and Bearded Vulture conservation. Well done to all the participants and those that pledged their support! Lets hope that these threatened species will still be part of our natural heritage when future generations celebrate Heritage Day.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Unfortunately no movements for Kloutjie from now on. We found him dead on a farm in the north-eastern Free State last week (see photo). Thanks to David Weaver and Ben Hoffman for their assistance.

Kloutjie

Kloutjie was fitted with a transmitter in 2012 as a one year old and would have started breeding in the next couple of years. To lose a “nearly” adult bird is a great loss to the population.

On a more positive note, the Rhino Peak Challenge will once again be taking place on World Rhino Day (22 September). This Challenge raises funds for the Rhino and Bearded Vulture and in 2016 raised over R150 000 for the Bearded Vulture Breeding Programme. A big thank you to those that contributed last year; with the assistance of these funds we were able to collect four (second) eggs from the wild this year and successfully hatch three chicks at the African Birds of Prey Sanctuary. For more information please see http://www.rhinopeakchallenge.co.za/participants/?yearopt=2017. If you would like to pledge your support, scroll down to Influential People, Sonja Krüger.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

It looks like Kloutjie has stopped moving for a few days so we will investigate this and update you next week – hopefully he has just dropped his transmitter

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

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Tanglewood Farm NR

Report by Elena Russell

Saturday 2nd September 2017

Let’s not keep the best for last, on  Saturday we had two rarities!!

Firstly the Ayre’s Hawk Eagle up on the grasslands being harassed by a Yellow billed Kite – we have a lovely shot of  ‘The Photographer’ aka Mike Stead taking brilliant photos of the Ayre’s, please note one has to be lying on a grassy hillside for the best results.

Mike Stead on How to photogragh an Ayers’s Hawk Eagle

Ayre’s Hawk Eagle

I will admit we called Booted Eagle as it had recently been seen at Tanglewood and then there were the ‘landing lights’. I asked the expert, David Allan, who put me right and in the new Roberts I understand ‘landing lights’ are mentioned for the Ayres.

The second rarity is a flower!!! A ground orchid, Eulophia Clavicornis, and in Joan Walker’s book on wild flowers of Natal she mentions that it is rare for Tanglewood and found in the grassland.

Eulophia Clavicornis – a ground orchid

It was rather a chilly morning but with lots of bird song, Red-capped Robin-Chats, Olive Thrush, Dark-capped Bulbul, Sombre Greenbul, Fork-tailed and Square-tailed Drongos, masses of Black-bellied Starlings and the juvenile Crowned Eagle called incessantly to be fed.

As the morning warmed up more and more birds were seen, our total count was 73. Click here to see our list.

We took the Waterfall Trail in the hopes of seeing the Knysna Turaco and were not disappointed but it was rather a hard slog and there were rumblings of discontent from some of the troops.

On the path down we came across a pair of Blue-mantled Crested Flycatchers – a nice one for the list.

We then drove up to the Boat House for a walk over the grasslands. The Fish Eagle has taken up residence on the Boat House veranda

and sat in the trees waiting patiently for us to leave.

African Fish-Eagle

There are Yellow Weavers nesting on the spit by the road, Holub’s Golden Weavers and Cape Weavers were busy at their nests by the veranda and made for a very pleasant spot to have our picnic tea.

But first our walk through the grasslands. Cape Grassbird, Croaking Cisticola, Yellow-throated Longclaw, Amethyst, Olive and Greater Double-collared Sunbirds

Olive Sunbird

and the Ayre’s Hawk Eagle!

Ayre’s Hawk Eagle

 

The profusely flowering trees by the Boat House are Dombeya rotundifolia – very pretty.

The photo of the strange nest in a tree is (we think) a Processionary Moth?

Perhaps a Processionary Moth’s nest

Whilst having our picnic at the Boat House we watched a Yellow-billed Kite picking up sticks and taking them back to a big tree across from the 2nd dam.

Yellow-billed Kite

Later on the pair were seen copulating on top of a pylon – not exactly the bridal suite at the Ritz but the pylon does come with a superb view.

We had a good outing and my thanks to Mike Stead, Penny de Vries and Sandi du Preez for the great photos.

Cheers

Elena

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SAPPI Stanger

3rd September 2017

Report by Rex Aspeling

We started on a perfect Spring day with 8 BLPN members and 5 guests. The water level at the Tranquillity Bird Hide (SAPPI Stanger Bird Hide) was very high and reduced the mudflats by more than 90%.

The normal proliferation of returning migrant waders was substantially reduced. This was more than adequately compensated by many Warblers, Cisticolas and other birds loving the new reed beds.

The introduction of a weevil population to eat the floating “Alien” cabbage has proved very successful. Everyone involved at SAPPI needs to be thanked for some very fine thinking.

A total of 88 species of birds were seen on the day. Click here to see the list. We finished by 11h00.

Thanks to David Swanepoel for the Photograghs.

Rex

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Hopefully many of you participated in the annual Vulture Count Day as part of International Vulture Awareness Day on Saturday. It will be interesting to see if any of our tagged birds were seen.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Weekend at Oribi Gorge.

 25th – 27th August 2017

Report by Jane Morris/Roseblade

Oribi gorge always offers great birding with dramatic scenery thrown in for good measure and I for one was really looking forward to this weekend away.  Despite predictions of rain on Sunday we were blessed with relatively good weather albeit a little chilly in the early mornings and evenings.

Mike and I arrived mid-morning and did a meander around the camp and along the entrance road where we were entertained by monkeys, both Samango and Vervet family groups who were raiding the sugarcane plantation, hauling whole lengths of cane across the road then shimming up the trees where they sat and munched upon them with great enjoyment.

By lunch time our party had swelled to include Jenny, Elena, Ros, Jenny and Dave (Rix) and ourselves.

Picnic on the upper bridge – Jenny Rix

While we were meeting and greeting Mike got a call from Cheryl, our weekend leader, advising that due to ill health she and John were not going to be able to join us.

Cheryl also advised that Andy Ruffle was indisposed and so we would more than likely not be able to access the vulture hide.

Left to our own devices we quickly regrouped and were soon in the cars and headed down the road to the picnic area half way down the hill. This area is always good in the late afternoon as the last rays of the sun are still on the rock faces and hill side.  It was cold but this did not deter the birds and good views were obtained of African Firefinch and Grey Cuckoo-shrike.

Brown-hooded Kingfisher

For the balance of the weekend we decided to bird in small groups (according to how early we wanted to rise from warm beds) but meeting up for tea and lunch at appointed times.

Jenny Norman chivvied her group out first, Jenny Rix and I left at a respectable 06h40 and the 2 gentlemen in our party arrived for birding at 10h30 – as to what time they arose from warm beds we did not inquire.

Butterflies were free everywhere.

There was no shortage of small bird parties as we travelled about the area.  The picnic site as always was very productive with Spotted Ground-Thrush, Knysna and Olive Wood-peckers calling and showing themselves, an adult Olive Bush-Shrike bounded through the trees with a juvenile in hot pursuit and of course the Starred Robins, both adult and juvenile were present.

Southern Tchagra put in a brief appearance, Yellow-throated Woodland-Warbler was a highlight for all of us as was Swee Waxbill, Forest Canary and Green Twinspot.

Jenny, Elena and Ros were fortunate to get good views of Narina Trogon although Jenny Rix and I were lucky enough to get a solitary Cape Vulture soaring overhead.

Our evenings were spent under the shelter of the cottage veranda which afforded some warmth, Mike and Dave excelled at lighting the fires and cooking to the satisfaction of all.  As always there was a great deal of debate and merriment.

The finale of the weekend was coffee and cake at the Leopard Rock Café – this seems to have become a BLPN tradition and then amid fond adieu’s we all headed out in different directions.  Mike and I home, Jenny and Dave to spend another (quiet) night and Elena, Jenny and Ros to do some more birding before departing.

The total bird count for the weekend was 126 species, a good number by any standard. Click here to view our list.

We missed Cheryl and John and hope Cheryl is recovering well. We were bitterly disappointed to miss the Vulture Hide but hope that Andy is also well on the road to recovery – and now there is a good excuse to visit Oribi again soon!!

Jane Morris/Roseblade

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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News on the Wing found in Hillcrest/Waterfall

From: Elena Russell [mailto:elenarussell@telkomsa.net]

Sent: 23 August 2017 01:48 PM

To: David Allan

Subject: FW: Wing

Hi David

The wing was found under a tree in my sister’s garden – Hillcrest/Waterfall area. There were also pheasant feathers (at least that’s what I think they are).

At the outing on Sunday we thought the wing maybe from an owl!!!

Please let us know what you think (my sister is also keen to know). She has genets in her roof – mainly winter time as the roof gets too hot in summer.

Cheers

Elena


From Elena

Hi Tania

FYI this is what David Allan had to say and it makes sense as the other feathers you gave me were definitely from a pheasant (I checked my UK book on birds).

So somebody lost a pheasant & a partridge – hopefully the pear tree is still there!

Hi Paul – You may like to put David Allan’s ID of the wing feathers on the web?

Cheers

Elena



From: David Allan [mailto:David.Allan@durban.gov.za]

Sent: 24 August 2017 09:45 AM

To: Elena Russell <elenarussell@telkomsa.net>

Subject: RE: Wing photo

Hi Elena

Looks very ‘domestic’ to me. And galliform . . .

Some sort of poultry: chicken, turkey, that sort of thing. Partridge indeed could be the culprit.

Definitely not an owl.

The predator might be a raptor as the circumstances fit well. Black Sparrowhawk, or even Crowned Eagle, especially out that way where there are many such birds of prey.

Thanks.

Regards – David


 

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Empisini Outing

Sunday 20 August 2017

Nine members and three visitors – some of the visitors got lost, a GPS does not always work but cell phones do and with a few judicious directions eventually everybody arrived.

We had decided to walk up the dirt road alongside the reed beds whilst waiting for the latecomers.

Little Rush Warblers called but not much else in the reeds but the trees and bush alongside the road were alive with birds. A Gorgeous Bushshrike called incessantly but was not seen and eventually a group of us broke off to hunt for more exciting stuff!  A few diehards remained behind and Dave Rimmer’s persistence eventually paid off (see a bit of red breast in the trees!).

Gorgeous Bushshrike – Dave Rimmer

Sandi and I did the list in the car driving back and our count was 66 (list attached – click here). Dave and Penny went down to the river (same pentad) and picked up Goliath and Grey Heron.

The bird of the day must be the Black-chested Snake Eagle and it was seen a number of times. We also had a fabulous display by a pair of Crowned Eagles, Long-crested Eagle  and Black Sparrowhawks.

African Crowned Eagle in action sequence – Mike Jackson

A close second to bird of the day must be the Scaly-throated Honeyguide -also called incessantly the whole morning and also was difficult to find.

Plus Lesser Honeyguide and Brown-backed Honeybird – good day for honeyguides.

Lovely views of a Bar-throated Apalis. Sunbirds: Amethyst, Collared, Olive. Weavers: Dark-backed, Spectacled, Thick-billed & Village and lots more.

The walk along the main path was fine – Scadoxus i.e. Snake Lily were in flower and Red-capped Robin-Chats called. Then the path came to an end and we turned up towards the grasslands and that’s when it turned into an obstacle course.

The triffid is rampant, trees have fallen across the path and the scrub/bush is taking over. No more grasslands! We eventually had to turn back (the crossing over the creek was a bridge too far) but Penny (the pathfinder) found us a different way and so we scrambled down a bank and up the other side to get back to the path and eventually a very late tea.

After tea we decided to walk alongside the river but again after a short distance were thwarted by the huge trees which had fallen across the path and the bush which had taken over on the other side of the trees. We wandered around for a bit longer but then decided to call it a day.

We had a great outing and everybody enjoyed themselves, even the bundu-bashing was met with glee but it does make birding a little difficult.

Thanks to Dave Rimmer and Mike Jackson for some great photos.

I know you cannot imagine why a photo of a raptors (?) wing is attached.  It was found under a tree in my sister’s garden (Hillcrest) and she thinks it must be the genets that winter in her roof that caught the bird – what bird?

Wing of a ?????

I have sent it to David Allan so let’s see what he has to say.

Cheers

Elena

 

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Outing to Durban Botanical Gardens

 16 August 2017

Report by Sandi Du Preez

The weather forecast looked bad – cloudy/rainy and gale-force winds. But 9 lucky birders were blessed with a glorious sunny, wind-free morning. Waiting at the entrance for everyone to arrive, we had good sightings of Common and Red-winged Starlings, Blacksmith Lapwings and Lesser Striped Swallows.

We made our way to the butterfly garden to see what was around. This is a very special area (established at the beginning of 2016) where indigenous plants that attract butterflies, moths  and other insects have been planted. We saw a Brimstone Canary, Streaky-headed Seedeater while a Hamerkop flew overhead.

A large part of the lake area has been cordoned off for maintenance work.

In the Casuarina trees there were some nests of Grey Herons and African Spoonbills with a fluffy juvenile on one spoonbill nest.

One Grey Heron was sunning itself with outstretched wings that were folded inwards. It looked as if it was wearing a ballet tutu! Unfortunately, no Pelicans today. Other birds in and around the lake area were Sacred ibis, Hadeda Ibis, Palm Swifts, Common Moorhen, Egyptian and Spur-winged Geese, Malachite Kingfisher, White-faced Duck and nesting Village Weavers. A pair of Egyptian Geese were tending their cute babies but when the Spurwings entered the water, the babies followed them in and swam around with the Spurwings!

As usual, there were Black Flycatchers and Kurrichane Thrushes everywhere, and Tawny-flanked Prinias were busy cocking their tails in several parts of the gardens. We also saw two Red-capped Robin-Chats having a little tiff. An African Paradise Flycatcher with the longest tail we had ever seen was flitting about in one of the trees. I’m sure that he must have had all the females swooning over him!

Kurrichane Thrush

Quite a few Rose-ringed Parakeets screeched overhead  for most of the morning. Everyone was also thrilled to hear a Klaas’s Cuckoo although we didn’t see it. Black-headed Orioles were also calling constantly and we were were lucky to see a sub-adult  with it’s dark bill.

There were not many sunbirds around but we heard a very vocal Olive Sunbird and as we searched for it, it flew down onto a Scadoxus flower to help itself to the nectar – a really fantastic sighting.

Then just before we headed for the tea-room, we got the bird/s of the day. A spectacular sighting of a male and female Black-throated Wattle-eye together in the same tree!

The Black Sparrowhawk was on it’s favourite perch on a  Norfolk Pine.

Black Sparrowhawk

At tea-time our bird count was 58. After everyone left I went for another little walk and managed to add four more species – Crested barbet, Purple-crested Turaco, Cape Batis and Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird. So the final tally was 62 species (this is 12 more than last year’s outing in August 2016). Click here to see the outing’s bird list.

When I went back to the lake area the sprinkler had been turned on and the Egyptian and Spurwinged Geese were having a great time!

Having fun under the sprinkler

Please excuse the poor quality of the photos. My usual photographer (John Bremner) is overseas.

Sandi du Preez

 

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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Vulture Hide – Oribi

Hi Netters,

With the holiday season once again creeping up on us very quickly, here are the dates for our scheduled vulture viewing experiences to the end of the year.

(If you have never been then you are missing out on something special) an insert by the administer of the BLPN website.

We have again added Wednesday visits throughout December and the beginning of January.

Breeding activity is in full swing and thanks to more accurate monitoring, we counted a record 94 active nests in July. This is up from the average 50 which we would normally expect.

Hopefully, the skies will be full of fledglings by November.

R100.00** per person minimum donation. However, larger donations will always be greatly appreciated and will enable our project to expand it’s ambitions.

These visits are conducted from cliff vantage points where you can view the vultures flying and on the breeding cliffs.

For some comments from previous visitors please visit:

http://vulturehide.blogspot.com/p/guest-book.html

Booking Dates:

22 August 2017 (Tue) 0930-1130 CONFIRMED limited spaces available

26 August 2017 (Sat) 0900-1100 CONFIRMED limited spaces available

02 September 2017 CLOSED

09 September 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

16 September 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

23 September 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

30 September 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

07 October 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

14 October 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

21 October 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

28 October 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

04 November 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

11 November 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030 to be confirmed

18 November 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030 to be confirmed

25 November 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030 to be confirmed

02 December 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030 to be confirmed

06 December 2017 (WED) 0830-1030

09 December 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

13 December 2017 (WED) 0830-1030

16 December 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

20 December 2017 (WED) 0830-1030

23 December 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

27 December 2017 (WED) 0830-1030

30 December 2017 (Sat) 0830-1030

 

ADVANCE BOOKING ESSENTIAL (Minimum 24hrs notice required please)

To book one of the scheduled visits or to arrange a date of your choice

please email:

bookings.vulturehide(at)yahoo.co.za

or WhatsApp: 081 510 8333

or Cell: 072 893 3794

**based on minimum of 3 people per group for visit to take place and subject to change.

Andy Ruffle

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Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures; Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture; Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

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