PARADISE VALLEY ON WED. 15 FEBRUARY

Report by Sandi du Preez
It was raining on arrival and I had already received some messages from members who decided not to attend because of the rain.
But John, Ros, Elena, Kay and I thought that we would just go quickly to the bridge to see if the Mountain Wagtails were there and then go home.
Well, of course the Wagtails were there – they always are!
Despite the drizzle, it was very pleasant and wind-free so we decided to fetch our chairs and coffee and sit under the shelter at the office and have an early picnic time. That proved to be a very wise decision as we were treated to  excellent sedentary birding.
The Mountain Wagtails delighted us by coming up onto the lawn and into the trees. A young Red-chested Cuckoo gave us wonderful views as it moved conspicuously on the branches of one of the trees. There are some dead trees nearby which are always “decorated” with Hadedas  and of course they were on their perches today. A Crowned Eagle flew onto the top of a tall distant dead tree and was harassed by a single Hadeda who obviously coveted that particular perch for itself but the eagle was having none of that and would not budge!
Among other birds that we got to see or hear from our chairs were Dusky, Black and Spotted Flycatchers, Egyptian Goose, Hamerkop, Speckled Mousebird, Black-headed Oriole, Black-backed Puffback, Black-bellied, Glossy and Red-winged  Starlings, Amethyst and Olive Sunbirds, Southern Black Tit, Purple-crested Turaco and Cape White-eyes.
When the rain stopped, John, Ros and I went for a little  walk through the picnic area and along the river bank where we picked up Malachite Kingfisher, more pairs of Mountain Wagtails, Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird,  Tambourine Dove, as well as another good sighting of the Red-chested Cuckoo. (I think that it had been following us to reward us for not being intimidated by the rain!) In the car park we got a White-eared Barbet.
John then fetched his camera from his car in order to photograph the Mountain Wagtails and he got some bonus photos – dassies sheltering in the crevices of the rocky cliff and the Cuckoo turned up again!
Altogether we recorded 32 species – not bad for an outing that almost didn’t happen!
Sandi
Posted in Activities, Home, Posts, Reports | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture, Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Raptor Rescue Newsletter

Good day,

Please find attached (click here) our first newsletter for 2017.

Kind regards,

Tammy

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Umbogavango : Saturday 4 February 2017

Report by Elena Russell

It was a hot, hot day even at 06:00 but then so was the birding – turned out to be a most enjoyable morning’s birding.

In the security parking area there were Violet-backed Starlings, overhead Palm Swifts but I was too busy getting the ‘indemnity form’ signed to see much more.

Once in the picnic area we picked up Olive Woodpecker (gets a star) – we had a good turnout with some new members and visitors. Lucky for me Steve Davis had joined us and agreed to lead the one group – thanks Steve!

On the walk down to the very bottom hide we stopped off at the first bird hide – Little Grebe, plenty of Yellow and Village Weavers, and Red Bishops.

Later on we were to get Thick-billed and Spectacled Weavers.  The water birds were rather sparse, Yellow-billed Duck, Common Moorhen, a brief glimpse of a Reed Cormorant, Black Crake, Darter and of course Egyptian Geese and a solitary Spurwing Goose.

Our warbler count was much better; Willow, Little Rush, Lesser Swamp, African Reed and best of all Great Reed (gets a star)!  (John’s photo of the head and long bill helped with the ID back at the picnic site but it had also been heard calling).

Great Reed Warbler

Great Reed Warbler

To begin with a lot of birds were IDed on call but later seen. Brown-hooded Kingfisher, Diderik’s, Klaas’s and Red-chested Cuckoos, Black-headed Oriole, Red-capped Robin-Chat, Burchell’s Coucal, Tambourine and Red-eyed Doves, Purple-crested Turaco, Terrestrial Brownbul, Dark-capped Bulbul, Sombre and Yellow-bellied Greenbul, Sunbirds – Amethyst, Collared, Olive and Purple-banded. The Yellow-rumped Tinkerbirds called incessantly and perched obligingly for photoshoots!

Green-backed Cameroptera, Red-faced and Rattling Cisticolas, Black, Dusky and Paradise- Flycatchers, Speckled Mousebirds, Bronze and Red-backed Mannikins, Little Bee-eater, Fan-tailed Widowbirds, Black-collared, Crested and plenty of White-eared Barbets, Tawny-flanked Prinia, Black-backed Puffback, African Hoopoe, African Fish-Eagle, Yellow-billed Kites, Black Saw-wing, Barn, Lesser Striped and White-throated Swallows and plenty more.

Tamsin and Jane who arrived early picked up an African Openbill (gets a star!).

My group saw a raptor – there were two schools of thought!!  John managed to get a shot and back at the picnic site Steve and Jenny both agreed it had to be a Honey Buzzard (another star).

European honey-Buzzard

European honey-Buzzard

Our count at tea was 99 – we were not allowed to count the blue Budgie (could have been another star).

Then two Woolly-necks flew over – 100!! But a little later an African Firefinch was heard calling from the very top of a gumtree (not the usual place for an African Firefinch but a definite ID was made) – so now our count was 101 but as they say in the classics “don’t count your buzzards before they hatch”. Steve’s group who called Common Buzzard were wrong!  When Steve checked his photos back at home it turned out to be a Honey Buzzard (great photo).  So our final count was 100 – not too shabby!!

Thanks to John, Steve and Mick for photos.

Cheers

Elena

Posted in Activities, Home, Posts, Reports | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture, Bennie for the past week.

We were informed of a poisoning incident last week which on closer inspection revealed at least 20 Cape Vultures on two properties in the Free State. Many thanks to those that assisted with collecting the birds and investigating the incident. The purpose of the poisoning is not known but assumed to be predator control since a few dead dogs and jackal were also found. This incident is another reminder that we need to increase our awareness efforts and ensure landowners know that poisoning is illegal and alternative methods of predator control exist.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Eston Ponds

Sunday  22 January 2017

Report by Dave Rimmer

It was an early 6am start in anticipation of hot weather forecast towards midday for the January Sunday outing. A total of 23 eager birders assembled at the entrance to the Eston Sugar Mill and proceedings commenced with a few words in honour of the late Roy Cowgill. His contributions to birding, environmental matters on the eastern seaboard and Birdlife South Africa were fondly recalled, along with the tremendous knowledge he has imparted to many BLPN birders over the years, and hence the outing was dedicated to Roy. From here we drove in convoy down to the dams bordering the Eston pond. Thanks to local farmer Derek Bennet for allowing us to park under the trees next to his dam.

We were treated to a feast of birds during the course of the morning eventually racking up a final count of 90 by close of the outing. Excellent views were had of Little Bittern (lifer for Rex Aspeling) and Black-crowned Night Heron flying up and down the channel between the dams. ‘

The first section along the western flank of the pond yielded very few birds due to expansion of the reed beds into the previously exposed mudflats. Spirits were soon lifted when all managed to get good views of what was to be our bird of the day – Orange-breasted Waxbill.

The section along the dam wall proved very rewarding with sufficient water and mudflats hosting a wide array of waders and water birds, and an assortment of birds overhead on the wing.

The eastern section of the pond was quickly inspected but being largely overgrown and bordered by sugar cane fields we opted to return along the same route back to the cars. As always, the return walk sees the group unravel into smaller groups as some head for a bite to eat whilst others mopped up on birds missed earlier, as well as practicing their ID skills on all the swifts and swallows flying overhead.

Very loosely classified, some of the birds seen (and heard) included:

Waders: Little Stint, Ruff, Wood Sandpiper, Common Ringed and Three-banded Plover, Blacksmith Lapwing, Black Crake, Common Moorhen, White-winged Tern, African Rail (heard), African Swamphen, African Jacana, Hamerkop

Raptors: African Marsh Harrier, Jackal Buzzard, Long-crested Eagle, Common Buzzard, Yellow-billed Kite, African Fish Eagle.

Water fowl: Hottentot and Red-billed Teal, White-faced Whistling Duck, Little Grebe, Cape Shoveler, Egyptian and Spur-winged Goose, Red-knobbed Coot, White-breasted and Reed Cormorant.

Swifts: Horus, Little, African Palm, African Black, and White-rumped.

Swallows: White-throated, Barn, Greater-striped, Lesser-striped.

Other notables: Red-necked Spurfowl, Grey-crowned Crane, Diederik Cuckoo, African Firefinch, Southern Masked Weaver, Streak-headed Seedeater, Dark-capped Yellow Warbler, Pin-tailed Whydah, Malachite Kingfisher, Willow Warbler, White-bellied Sunbird, Brown-throated Martin, Dusky Indigobird (en route near Camperdown).

A full protocol atlas card for the outing was submitted to SABAP2, and although no ORFs were received, the Little Bittern, Horus Swift, and White-winged Tern were first time records for the pentad. Viva atlassing!!!

White-winged Tern  (Ryan Ramsamy)

White-winged Tern (Ryan Ramsamy)

Little Bittern  (Ryan Ramsamy)

Little Bittern (Ryan Ramsamy)

Grateful thanks extended to Tony Bevis and Ryan Ramsamy for sharing their photographs.

Yours in birding,

Dave Rimmer

 

Posted in Activities, Home, Posts, Reports | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here)https://birdlifepn.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/vultures_29jan17to5feb17.pdf the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture, Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture, Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Latest Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture, Bennie for the past week.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Tawny Frogmouths

A pair of Tawny Frogmouths caught our eyes as we walked down Spring Gully, Bendigo in Victoria Australia.

They stayed all day but were gone the next morning.

Other birds seen on this trail:

Paul Bartho and Sally King

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Cape and Bearded Vulture tracks – latest

Dear All

Please find attached (Click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture Bennie for the period 8-15 January 2017.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Raptor Rescue Newsletter

To read the December issue of the Raptor Rescue Newsletter then click here.

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Community guide appeal

Hi everyone

As many of you will know BirdLife South Africa likes to offer the community guides an opportunity to attend the annual AGM/Flock meetings and this year is no different except that it is Flock at Sea AGAIN 2017 and presents an even more exciting opportunity for four lucky guides. The guides we have  chosen to attend this year are Samson Mulaudzi from Limpopo and then from KZN we have chosen Themba Mthembu, Bheki Nyandeni and Bheki Mbonambi. I am sure your members will know of them or have even benefitted from their services at some stage.

I would like to ask you to advertise among your club members to see if we can raise any funding for them to attend Flock at Sea later in the year.

We have managed to secure funding to kit them out with suitable clothing for the cruise but now we are looking for sponsors to assist with their cruise costs as well as transport and accommodation costs before and after the cruise. We have raised a few funds since we placed an advert on Facebook yesterday but we need a lot more to come in.

Each guide will need about R11000 to be able to attend, so we are appealing for R44 000 in total. Every small donation helps, but bigger ones help even more. So far we have raised just over R10 000 with one bird club having donated R5000, the remainder has come in from individuals.

Members can deposit any donations into the BirdLife bank account as per the attached details. Please email any proof of deposits through to me at ian.owtram@birdlife.org.za so I can keep a record of where we are sitting at on a daily basis.

I hope we manage to find enough willing and kind sponsors to realise this one in a lifetime dream for these deserving guides.

Kind regards and many thanks in anticipation

Ian Owtram

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Saturday 7 January 2017 : Bluff Nature Reserve

Report by Elena Russell

I left home in heavy drizzle which lifted a little near Queensburgh but by the time I hit the Bluff it was heavy drizzle again.  The dog’s chances of a walk in heavy drizzle were starting to look good but it was not to be!

Firstly let me say that the mood was very sombre as we gathered in the parking area, we had just lost a good friend and stalwart of BLPN in Roy Cowgill. Roy will be sorely missed and deepest sympathy for Steve was expressed by us all.

Eight BLPN members had pitched up, rain or shine 2017 needed to be kicked off with some birding.

The Bluff Nature Reserve was in fact a good choice as there is an excellent hide and most of us stayed in the hide but a few hardy souls did take a walk in the rain and picked up some good coastal forest birds: African Paradise Flycatcher, Black-throated Wattle-eye, Southern Boubou, Red-capped Robin-Chats, White-eared and Black-collared Barbets, Olive Sunbird, Cape White-eye, Yellow-bellied and Sombre Greenbuls plus some more but no list was kept.

Sitting in the hide was a pleasure, plus the group was small enough for all of us to take part in a Saturday Chat Show!

The channel in front of the hide does appear to have been cleared so there is a good view down to the ‘pond’. Not much on the pond but the channel was very productive. The highlight was a pair of Lesser Swamp Warblers building a nest not more than a metre away from the hide. Lots of Red Bishops, masses of Thick-billed Weavers – one pair was feeding chicks in a nest very close by.

A Moorhen was most attentive of her last surviving juvenile – attrition of her chicks must have been brutal.  Black Crakes were a little luckier as there appeared to be two juveniles.

A pair of African Jacanas were also present and they also had two chicks left. Bronze Mannikins came and went.

bronze-mannikinSpectacled and Yellow Weavers, Rufous-winged Cisticola, Little Rush Warblers, an African Fish Eagle which sat in the trees across the pond, an African Darter swam by – maybe not much more but it kept us entertained for most of the morning.

Photos care of Adam Cruickshank.

Cheers, Best Wishes and good birding in 2017.

Elena

Posted in Activities, Home, Posts, Reports | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Vulture Tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture Bennie for the period 1-8 January 2017.

Kind regards

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Vulture tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, InkosiYeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture Bennie for the period 25 December 2016 to 1 January 2017.

Luckily Bennie is active again.

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Kerang Lakes, Victoria, Australia

Report by Sally and Paul Bartho

28 December 2016

Sally and I are based in Bendigo with family. We decided to have a day away and go birding in the surrounding area.

Tim Dolby’s book “Where to see birds in Victoria” suggested we take a look at the Kerang Lakes – just over an hour’s drive north of Bendigo.

Kerang Lakes in relation to Bendigo and Melbourne

Kerang Lakes in relation to Bendigo and Melbourne

The Kerang Lakes are in a flood prone region where many rivers and creeks converge to fill wetland areas. The drive was through farm lands – very flat and not exactly attractive countryside (in our opinion).

After an hour and a half we arrived in Kerang close to our first attempt at birding – almost 07h00.

Kerang Lakes

Kerang Lakes

Based on the information in Tim Dolby’s book and the time we had available we decided to visit:

  • Fosters Swamp
  • Middle Lake
  • Lake Tutchewop
  • Round Lake and
  • Lake Boga.

All shown on the map above.

Fosters Swamp – a saline wetland with salt marshes round the edges was unfortunately dry. So no sightings of any waders. Needless to say we quickly left and headed for Middle Lake.

Middle Lake was a surprise. There were many birds – Ibises, numerous Ibises – Straw-necked, Australian White and Glossy – we were not surprised by the sign we saw at the entrance.

Ibis Rookery

Ibis Rookery

This was definitely the highlight of our day. The facilities were good – pathways and an unusually designed bird hide overlooking the rookery. The rookery included the full extent of Middle Lake and Ibises were everywhere. It was difficult to identify other species among them. But we did see a Little Pied Cormorant sitting on a dead branch. Even a Yellow-throated Miner was seen.

Unfortunately the day was very windy with the odd shower and birds were scarce. Despite that some birds were still long enough for a photo.

Overhead the air was constantly occupied with mainly Ibises as well as some Black Kites and Royal Spoonbills.

Moving on, we headed for Lake Tutchewop. Another very open lake with sparse vegetation around it. We were able to drive reasonably close passing a pair of Nankeen Kestrels flying beside us. Near the water we saw a number of water birds on the water’s edge some distance away. These included many Silver Gulls, Caspian Terns, some Whiskered Terns, a group of Red-necked Avocets as wells as many Red-capped Plovers.

An overhead White-faced Heron caught our attention.

White-faced Heron

White-faced Heron

Driving alongside the lake heading north on a dirt track we encountered Australian Pipits every hundred metres – not necessarily in ones or twos but at times up to six together foraging on the road ahead of us.

Our next stop was Lake Round to the west of the town called Lake Boga. The Lake was full and there were some ducks on the opposite side but in all not much of interest.

And lastly to the lake with the same name as the town – Lake Boga. Again disappointing as it was very difficult to get close to the lake’s edge and there was not much to see on the expanse of water.

And then it was back to Bendigo via a different route. Passing one pond by the road there was a family of Grey Teal, a pair of Masked Lapwings, a Australian Swamphen and this Black-winged Stilt. A Black-shouldered Kite flew overhead.

black-winged-stilt_resize

Black-winged Stilt

Back home in Bendigo we were entertained by this Blue-tongued Lizard trying to get indoors.

In all we recorded seeing 38 different bird species. See our list by clicking here.

Cheers and Happy New Year to you all.

Paul and Sally

Red-rumped Parrot

Red-rumped Parrot

 

 

 

Posted in Home, Posts | 1 Comment

Latest Vulture Tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, Inkosi Yeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture Bennie for the period 18-25 December 2016.

A big thank you to Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife’s Pat Lowry and his Field Rangers and Ben Hoffman from Raptor Rescue for finding Shuttle’s transmitter. The transmitter did indeed fall off the bird. A bird with wing tags was seen flying nearby, so hopefully Shuttle is still alive and well.

It appears that Bennie is now stationary (hopefully just from feasting over Christmas), so we will keep an eye on him now.

Wishing you all the best for the new year and hoping that our birds stay safe!

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Phillip Island

17 December 2016

Report by Sally and Paul Bartho

Sally’s son David and his fiancee Katrina went to Cairns for the weekend on business while we were visiting in Melbourne. Their car was at our disposal.

We took the opportunity to visit Phillip Island – about a two hour drive east of the entrance to the harbour.

Our goal was to see the Little Penguins coming in to roost at sunset. As we were there for only one night it was impossible to be at Cape Woolamai at the same time to see the millions of Short-tailed Shearwaters flying in to roost. There was also the opportunity to see Koalas. The brochures also indicated that we should find thousands of waders in the Rhyll estuary, mangroves and mudflats and that Swan lake was worth a visit for birding.

phillip-island-1

This was our first chance to go birding since we arrived. We wanted to refresh our memory of Australian birds and Phillip Island enabled us to reacquaint ourselves.

Leaving Melbourne at 05h00, we arrived just after seven and went straight to Cape Woolamai on the off chance of seeing late departures of the Short-tailed Shearwaters.

The weather was cold, overcast and very blustery. Unfortunately we were not lucky enough to see any but we did see this Swamp Harrier.

Swamp Harrier

Swamp Harrier

Then we headed to Rhyll and walked to the estuary.

Thousands of waders there might have been but nowhere in the area we hoped to find them. A few different species of water birds were seen in the distance including Silver Gulls, Australian (Sacred) Ibis, Pacific Black Ducks.  Some photos taken in the area:

Our next destination was the Penguin Parade to purchase a seat for the evening event. For a little extra we also were able to visit the Koala Reserve. We took a walk down to the beach where the Little Penguins would emerge at sunset to explore the area. On the way down we saw a Swamp Wallaby close-by.

Then at the beach we found three Hooded Plovers – two with rings. We understand that this is a threatened species.

We were hoping to find the odd L Penguin in the daylight so that we could take a photo or two. Photography at night during the parade is forbidden. Again we were not fortunate. However we did find an interesting bird party at the entrance to the car park.

We took a drive round the headland – Nobbies – to get a high point view of coast line.

Leaving Nobbies we headed back to the Koala Reserve. There were two main fenced in boardwalks enclosing Eucalyptus trees in which several Koalas inhabited.

We saw three Koalas in each enclosure – doing what they do best – curled up sleeping.

Walking round the enclosures we saw quite a few different species of birds especially overlooking the wetlands on one of the boardwalks. Even a Swamp Wallaby made an appearance.

While walking between the two enclosures a Forest kingfisher made an appearance.

After dinner we headed for the Penguin Parade – arriving an hour and a half early to get a good seat – sheltered from the wind which made the cool evening a lot colder.

Seats filling up.

Seats filling up.

As people arrived so the stands filled and even a cordoned off sand area in front of both stands filled. We waited for sundown and the first penguins were expected at 21h00. Sally and I had our binoculars with us so we were able to scout the sea for sightings of flocks of penguins gathering in groups before they made their dash up the beach.

Then the moment arrived and the first group made a dash. Up they came then one got nervous and started back – the whole lot followed.Up and down they wavered, groups and groups making their charge up the beach. Sometimes the groups were as much as a hundred strong. In total they expected almost a thousand Little Penguins to come ashore.

Several parties came up the beach between the two main grand stands so we were able to get a very close-up view. The temptation was there to take photos but most people resisted.

Then the rain came and there was a mad congested dash for shelter. Fortunately it was not a downpour. Walking back up to the car park you could hear all the youngsters calling for their parents and you could see them standing outside their burrows. The adults were walking up the roads so close you could almost touch them. It was quite an experience and all over by 22h00.

The next day we headed for Churchill Island. The first bird we encountered was a Pied Oystercatcher.

The variety of birds was limited but a few species were in abundance.

Then we headed for Swan Lake near Nobbies. Along the path down to the hides, a bird flew in front of us – calling. At first we thought it was a pigeon but it turned out to be a cuckoo – a Pallid Cuckoo.

There were two hides with shallow wetlands in front of each.

Some of the other birds photographed at Swan Lake:

Altogether we recorded seeing 56 species. Click here to see our bird list.

This was a very pleasant venue for us despite the weather.

Paul and sally Bartho

Koala curled up

Koala curled up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment

Vulture Tracks

Dear All

Please find attached (click here) the movements of our Bearded Vultures: Jeremia, Pharaoh, Inkosi Yeentaka, Lehlwa, Mac, Kloutjie, Camo and Mollie and our Cape Vulture Bennie for the period 11 – 18 December 2016.

We have not been able to find Shuttle’s transmitter yet but will continue the search this week.

I have attached an article (click here) on the activities of the Bearded Vulture Task Force for your interest. The task force celebrated 10 years of existence this year, so it was a good time to reflect on the work that has been done to date.

Wishing you safe and blessed festive season and Christmas.

Sonja Krüger

http://www.projectvulture.org.za/

https://www.facebook.com/projectvulture
https://twitter.com/vultureproject

 

Posted in Home, Posts | Tagged | Leave a comment